Our Mission

We believe that evidence is an essential ingredient of the knowledge base of teaching. Knowing what worked, for whom, in other schools and for other teachers can inform our decisions about how to improve teaching and learning in our own context. 
Our team

Meet our team

Dr Wayne Harrison
CEO / Cofounder
Wayne taught as a science teacher before completing an MA and PhD at Durham University. He has previously developed two Ed-tech platforms focused on online peer tutoring for disadvantaged learners.
Prof Steve Higgins
Cofounder
Steve is the lead author of the EEF Teaching and Learning toolkit, Professor of Education and author of numerous educational books, chapters and research articles. Steve previously taught in primary schools in the North East of England. 
Dr John Brown
Director / Senior Statistician
John is a statistician specialising in education. He has worked for the Department of Education, the Institute of Education, in schools for the largest Academy Trusts in London as well as the Education Endowment Foundation at Durham University. He is interested in research methods in education and has published on randomized control designs in schools.  

Bridging the gap between research, teachers and EdTech.

We are supporting teachers to look at the evidence for the impact of new EdTech products before using them in their classroom because not all technology is effective in improving student learning. Using technology that has not been shown to be effective can be a waste of time and resources, and can also potentially harm student learning. By looking at the evidence, teachers can determine if a product has been shown to be effective in similar educational contexts, and can make an informed decision about whether or not to use the product in their own classroom.

Another important aspect of evaluating evidence is that technology and teaching methodologies are constantly changing and evolving, and what worked last year may not work this year. Therefore, we are supporting teachers to develop practitioner inquiry based projects to evaluate the impact of strategies and interventions, before sharing these with fellow teachers on the WhatWorked website to build an evidence base for what is and is not working in schools.

Evidence Base

Evidence Base

Evidence Base

Evidence Base

Evidence Base

Evidence Base

Evidence Base

We work with teachers to test interventions to find out what does and doesn't work in primary and secondary schools. The interventions are structured so they are easy for you to test if they have a positive impact in your classroom. When implementing an intervention, such as a peer tutoring programme, teachers can choose three levels of evaluation:

1) Teacher observation (1 star rating) 
2) Pre- and Post-Test single group (2 star rating)
3) Mini-Randomised Controlled Trial (3 star rating)

For the 3 star mini RCT's, the anonymised data is then aggregated to create a live evidence base to help inform teachers to decide which interventions will be best to use for your pupils.

Our evidence model uses a prospective cumulative meta-analysis (PCM) approach, which allows small scale mini-trials to be set up and run in schools. The key to this is the creation of a trial protocol to support teachers setting up and implementing an intervention in their school. The protocol is to ensure the same thing is tested in each setting. As the same research design, eligibility criteria for learners, resources and assessments are used, we are able to aggregate the results together to get a bigger picture of the results.

Words I live by

"It Ain't What You Do (It's the way that cha do it!) The Bananarama Principle.”

— Prof Steve Higgins



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